Student Services Newsletters

Student Services is sending out a newsletter monthly starting in the 2021-22 school year. The newsletter covers topics around Social-Emotional Learning, mental health support, and other relevant topics and resources.

Student Services Newsletter November 2021

The SEL theme for November is Social Awareness. APS Staff will focus on helping students develop their empathy muscle through lessons and activities. This month we also celebrate our school psychologists and the important work they do to help students thrive. In addition, all 8th and 10th grades are receiving a lesson from the Signs of Suicide program. The SOS Program is the only youth suicide prevention program that has demonstrated an improvement in students’ knowledge and adaptive attitudes about suicide risk and depression, as well as a reduction in actual suicide attempts. Lastly, read more about the parent support groups and trainings available, as well as the free and available to all, Cigna Student School Support Line.

SEL Focus: Social AwarenessImage of Globe

The ability to adopt the perspective of other people and to empathize with other people from diverse backgrounds and cultures. A person who is socially aware understands social and ethical norms for behavior and recognizes family, school, and community resources and support.

Skills that develop social awareness include:

  • Identifying social cues (verbal, physical) to determine how others feel
  • Taking others’ perspectives
  • Demonstrating empathy and compassion
  • Showing concern for the feelings of others
  • Understanding and expressing gratitude
  • Recognizing strengths in others
  • Identifying diverse social norms, including unjust ones
  • Recognizing situational demands and opportunities
  • Caring about and being motivated to contribute to the well-being of one’s family, friends, school, community, the environment, and the greater good
  • Appreciating diversity
  • Respect of others

Empathy and kindness can positively affect children in their social and academic lives. Teaching these skills is a big part of the Second Step social-emotional learning program.

Books About Empathy and Kindness for Early Leaders

By: Committee for Children (Find more here – 12 Recommended Children’s Books about Empathy & Kindness)

Picture of front of book "Those Shoes"Those Shoes by Maribeth Boelts, illustrated by Noah Z. Jones

Jeremy really wants the shoes that all the kids are wearing. The problem is that his family can’t afford them. Jeremy will do most anything to own a pair— including squeeze into a pair on sale that is a size too small. Jeremy soon discovers the “uncomfortable” consequences of this solution and begins to appreciate what he already has.  (caring, compassion, consequences, friendship, helping, name-calling, problem-solving, thinking of solutions)

Picture of book "A Sick Day for Amos McGee"A Sick Day for Amos McGee by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead

Amos McGee works at the zoo. Amos always finds time each day to spend in special ways with five of his animal friends. One day Amos is sick. His friends then get a chance to do something special for Amos. (caring, compassion, empathy, feelings, helping, understanding perspectives)

Picture of book "Most People"Most People by Michael Leannah, illustrated by Jennifer E. Morris

When the world looks scary, it’s reassuring to remember that most people want to be kind, helpful, loving, and funny. This book meanders through a busy city, showing all kinds of people helping, playing, and sharing. (compassion, feelings)

 

APS Highlight: SEL in ACTION

Picture of Mural at Glebe Elementary
Click on the image to watch video

The No Place for Hate® program is an organizing framework for K-12 schools committed to creating sustainable change that leads to improved school climate developed by the Education Department of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL). APS participating schools are able to incorporate ADL’s anti-bias and anti-bullying resources with their existing programming to form one powerful message that all students have a place to belong. Enjoy this video highlighting the No Place for Hate program at Glebe Elementary and how it supports the SEL and social awareness for their community.

 

 

National School Psychology Week: November 8-12, 2021

Picture of gears in motionDuring the week of November 8–12, 2021 schools throughout the country celebrated National School Psychology Week to highlight the important work school psychologists do to help students thrive. This year’s theme is “Let’s Get in GEAR.” (Grow, Engage, Advocate, Rise).  The theme’s acronym provides a challenge to grow both personally and professionally. It encourages us to engage in best practices and advocate for children’s access to mental health and learning supports. To rise implies resilience and renewal despite the challenges of the past. This has a particular resonance this year as we work to help students, families, and school staff emerge from the challenges of the past year and a half. When we get in gear, we move together. When one gear moves, the gears connected to it move as well. When we move together there is a positive synergy that builds and becomes greater than any single effort. Getting in GEAR together can help us set goals for growth, engage in action steps, advocate for needs, and raise our voices in discussions to create the connections necessary for students to develop critical academic and social emotional skills.

After what has been a long and challenging year for many, students and adults alike find themselves stuck in a rut or even regressing. We hope to connect students and staff to show that if they “Get in GEAR” together, it can lead to substantial positive change for all involved. Central to this theme is the importance of the relationships between all students, staff, faculty, and parents within a school building. This theme is perfect for any school that is actively looking to positively impact their school climate. Please visit the NASP’s Suggested Activities for Working with Students and Adults webpage https://www.nasponline.org/research-and-policy/advocacy/national-school-psychology-week-(nspw)/poster-activities for ideas to help you and your students thrive.

To find your building’s school psychologist, visit https://www.apsva.us/student-services/psychological-services/.

Mental Health Corner Screen Shot 2021-10-14 at 2.28.39 PM SOS – Signs of Suicide Program

SOS

During the months of October, November, December, Arlington Public Schools will be implementing a depression awareness and suicide prevention training to all eighth and tenth grade students as part of the SOS Signs of Suicide® Prevention Program. The program encourages students to seek help if they are concerned about themselves or a friend. The SOS Program is the only youth suicide prevention program that has demonstrated an improvement in students’ knowledge and adaptive attitudes about suicide risk and depression, as well as a reduction in actual suicide attempts. Listed on Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices, the SOS Program has shown a reduction in self-reported suicide attempts by 40-64% in randomized control studies (Aseltine et al., 2007; Schilling et al., 2016).

SOS posterThe goals in participating in this program are straightforward:

  • To help our students understand that depression is treatable
  • To explain that suicide is a preventable tragedy that often occurs as a result of untreated depression
  • To train students how to identify potential signs of depression and suicide risk in themselves or a friend
  • To impress upon youth that they can help themselves or a friend by taking the simple step of talking to a trusted adult about their concerns
  • To teach students who they can turn to at school for help, if they need it

During these three months, our Student Services Team will present the program to all  8th grade and 10th grade students. The program includes a SOS video which encourages students to ACT (Acknowledge, Care, Tell) when concerned about themselves or a friend. After viewing the video, students will participate in a group discussion and will complete a depression screener. During this program, your student will be introduced to adults who can help in the building and can request a same-day confidential appointment. To learn more about SOS lesson, please watch the video below

Helping Your Child Save a Life: Parent Training
Click on the image to watch video

LEARN MORE: Child & Family Services Parent Support Group Sessions

The Arlington Child and Family Services clinical staff is hosting Parent Support group sessions this fall on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Join other parents in your community to share experiences and learn about topics relevant to your family each week!  The next session is titled Managing Holiday Stress and will take place on November 16. Come support other parents and share your successes and lean in for support! Send any questions to cmarketti@arlingtonva.us. For information about Arlington County Spanish Speaking Parent Support Group, please email Norma Jimenez at Njimenez@arlingtonva.us.

LEARN MORE: Arlington Parent Support Groups (NAMI)

NAMIThese groups are geared to parents whose child is experiencing symptoms of a mental illness, including: depression, anxiety, eating disorders, mood disorders and more. No diagnosis is required to participate. Participants are given the opportunity to share their story, experience support, and glean guidance (as desired) from group members regarding both community and school resources. Confidentiality is respected.

 

Parents of School Age Students and Teens (PK-12): Sundays 7pm-8:30pm (Upcoming 11/21 and 12/5) Cherrydale Baptist Church, 3910 Lorcom Lane, Arlington, VA 22207 – Building Entrance 16, Rm 118

Older Teen and Young Adults: 3rd Sunday 1-3pmTrinity Presbyterian Church, 5533 16th St N, Arlington, VA 22207

Questions??  Contact:

  • PK-12: Michelle Best (mczero@yahoo.com)
  • Adults: Naomi Verdugo (verdugo.naomi@gmail.com)
  • Both: Alisa Cowen (acowen@cowendesigngroup.com)

LEARN MORE: Student Services Advisory Committee Invites YOU to learn more about SEL

Tuesday, November 16, 2021: 7pm ZOOM (details below)

The Student Services Committee invites you to their monthly meeting, featuring guest speakers Dr. Christina Choi and Peck Choi. Dr. Christina Choi is an author and presenter who appears regularly on TV and was the host of a very successful TV talk show in South Korea. She has made more than a dozen TV documentaries on marriage, parenting & education. Her TV documentary on motherhood received a Best Program award, and she was chosen as one of the three most influential women in Korea.  She is currently working on a miniseries with EBS, which is an equivalent of PBS in the U.S.  Dr. Choi and her husband, Peck Choi, will be talking to the committee about how they are making Social Emotional Learning a part of the culture.

Join the Zoom Meeting at: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86517661396?pwd=NnZqdTNDNlRmb010N1VxMWNLNXVDZz09

Meeting ID: 865 1766 1396 Passcode: 987123

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kcjJFLutqO

If you have any questions or need assistance joining the Zoom call, please email Alisa Cowen at Acowen@cowendesigngroup.com. If you have any questions about the speakers, please email kpickle@earthlink.net.

LEARN MORE: Youth Mental Health First Aid Training Available to Staff & Parents

Youth Mental Health First Aid TrainingThe Office of Student Services continues to be committed to training all new staff  and re-certifying staff in Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA). This is a 6-hour course that teaches how to identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. Registration for staff is through Frontline. Parents can register by calling the Office of Student Services at 703-228-6062. Training will be provided every month for the remainder of the year.

Upcoming session dates are: November 16, December 1, January 13, February 8, March 10, March 31, April 27, and May 10.

LEARN MORE: What can YOU do to prevent child abuse?

Arlington County, Child Advocacy Center offers Child Abuse Prevention Training. All courses are offered in English or Spanish on an ongoing basis throughout the year. Currently, all training sessions are offered virtually to ensure the health and safety in our community. For additional information about registering for one of these sessions, please visit the following link: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/20F0A45ACA829A6FD0-stewards1

Resources: CIGNA School Support Line – OPEN TO ALL

Don’t do it alone. There are many reasons to seek help. Some are common, others more serious. Either way, talk with us today if you or a family member are dealing with: Anxiety, Depression, Abuse, Eating disorders, Bullying, Self-harm, Addiction, Peer Pressure, Suicidal thoughts or anything else. No one has to be a Cigna customer to call. If you go to school, or have a child who goes to school, the School Support Line was created for you.This is a no-cost, confidential service that puts students and families in touch with mental health professionals who know how to listen, ask the right questions, and offer advice. And it’s available around the clock for you and for members of your family. 833-MeCigna (833-632-4462) We’re here 24/7/365!

Screen Shot 2021-11-10 at 1.44.36 PM

 

Student Services Newsletter October 2021

In October, APS staff will continue to focus on the SEL theme of Relationship Skills through activities and lessons. We also recognize October as Bullying and Substance Abuse Prevention Month. We are offering several free trainings for parents to learn more about the new marijuana laws in Virginia, how to help prevent child abuse, and how to best support the mental health of youth.

SEL Focus: Relationship Skills

Demonstrate the ability to effectively collaborate and navigate relationships while valuing different and diverse perspectives, abilities, backgrounds, and cultures. Check out this short video about how relationship skills affect learning and how important it is to foster healthy communication.

PBSLEARNING – Relationship Skills – SEL

October is Bullying Prevention Month

Post of Refuse, Recognize, Report - Click to Open PDF
Click Image to Open PDF

Recognize, Report, Refuse! October is National Bullying Prevention Month, a time to focus and raise awareness on bullying. Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, one-sided and happening on purpose. Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose.  Bullying can also take place through technology, known as cyberbullying.  Examples of cyberbullying include mean text messages or emails, rumors sent by email or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles.

Childhood bullying is a significant problem nationwide. It can cause school absenteeism, mental and physical stress, poor school performance, poor self-esteem, and in some cases, school violence. Students who experience bullying are at increased risk for depression, anxiety, sleep difficulties, lower academic achievement, and dropping out of school. Bullying can also happen online. Reports of cyberbullying among public school attending students are highest for middle school (33%), followed by high school (30%), combined schools (20%) and primary schools (5%). School board members, superintendents, teachers, and parents play a critical role in creating a climate where bullying is not tolerated. It has been proven when adults and children stand together, bullying ends.

APS teaches bullying prevention to educate and empower students to help create safe and supportive school communities. Throughout this month, counselors will engage in various bullying prevention efforts such as; reinforcing the three Rs of bullying prevention, Recognize, Report and Refuse, participating in Wear Orange Unity Day to show unity for kindness, support, and inclusion, and spreading the Upstander Pledge, a commitment to standing up for others. Everyone can do something to help prevent bullying; individuals, schools, and communities each have an important role. Learn what you can do.  APS provides a host of resources and helpful FAQs surrounding bullying. View this short video about our efforts. https://www.apsva.us/student-services/bully-prevention/

Rules to help everyone feel safe & respected​

poster of bystander power - click to open PDF
Click image to open PDF
  • Recognizing bullying – hurtful behavior that is repetitive and one-sided​
  • Reporting bullying – identifying trusted adult you can talk to​
  • Refusing bullying – use assertiveness skills​
  • Bystander power – people who see or know about bullying happening​
  • Bystander responsibility – you can choose to help stop the bullying​
  • Bystanders to Cyberbullying – Recognize, Refuse, and Report bullying online​

UNITY DAY: Wednesday October 20, 2021 WEAR & SHARE ORANGE

Show unity for kindness, acceptance, and inclusion and to send a visible message that no child should ever experience bullying.

 

National Substance Abuse Prevention Month

Red Ribbon Word CloudJoin teens, parents, teachers, and other citizens across America @RedRibbonWeek (October 23-31) #RedRibbonWeek #DrugFreeLooksLikeMe

October was first declared as National Substance Abuse Prevention Month in 2011. Since then, October has been a time to highlight the vital role of substance abuse prevention in both individual and community health and to acknowledge those in recovery, as well as children, parents, family, and friends supporting them. Studies show that the earlier an individual starts smoking, drinking or using other drugs, the greater the likelihood of developing addiction. 9 out of 10 people who abuse or are addicted to nicotine, alcohol or other drugs began using these substances before they were 18. People who began using addictive substances before age 15 are nearly 7 times likelier to develop a substance problem than those who delay first use until age 21 or older. Every year that substance use is delayed during the period of adolescent brain development, the risk of addiction and substance abuse decrease. During this month, we take the time to recognize national and community efforts to decrease substance misuse and addiction. We also gather to remember those who have lost their lives to addiction. October is also a time to celebrate recovery and show support to children, parents, family, and friends, who are directly impacted by the disease of addiction.

Each year, the Arlington County Public Schools Substance Abuse Counseling (SAC) team commemorates National Substance Abuse Prevention Month by recognizing Red Ribbon Week, which is the Nation’s oldest and largest drug prevention campaign, which pays tribute to DEA Special Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena, who was killed in the line of duty. This prevention-based initiative is celebrated annually during the last week of October, and it reaches millions of individuals across the world. During this time, the SAC team recognizes Red Ribbon Week by engaging our students across the county and providing them with educational materials, giveaways, and interactive activities. Learn more here – APS Substance Abuse Counselors

LEARN MORE: Marijuana is Legal, So What Now?

With the recent legalization of marijuana in the State of Virginia, concerns have emerged about the overall understanding of the law and the potential long-term impact this may have on our adolescent and adult population. This presentation was created to give our audience an overall understanding of the legislation and to obtain some useful information about misconceptions about marijuana with a peer to peer perspective as well.

Presented by: Jenny Sexton MA, CSAC, FAC, QMHP, CSAM Substance Abuse Counselor from Arlington Public Schools, Niasha John, Juvenile Domestic Relations Court Services Unit, Probation and Substance Use Counselor and Teen Network Board.

Thursday, October 19th, 2021 at 12:00 pm or 6:00 pm

REGISTER HERE – https://www.eventbrite.com/e/marijuana-is-legal-so-what-now-tickets-182792907507?aff=erelexpmlt

LEARN MORE: What can YOU do to prevent child abuse?

Arlington County, Child Advocacy Center offers Child Abuse Prevention Training. All courses are offered in English or Spanish on an ongoing basis throughout the year. Currently, all training sessions are offered virtually to ensure the health and safety in our community. For additional information about registering for one of these sessions, please visit the following link: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/20F0A45ACA829A6FD0-stewards1

LEARN MORE: Youth Mental Health First Aid

Social-emotional learning is a priority for APS and this course will teach skills for self-awareness and relationship skills in the aspects of recognizing potential mental health needs, managing your own feelings, and how to have conversations with those who may need to be connected to mental health services. Through this course, participants will gain the skills to recognize and support youth experiencing a mental health or substance abuse challenge or crisis. The course covers common signs and symptoms of mental illness in youth, including: anxiety, depression, eating disorders. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); common signs and symptoms of substance use; how to interact with a child or adolescent in crisis; how to connect the person with help.   NEW: Expanded content on trauma, addiction and self-care and the impact of social media and bullying. Participants will complete a 2-hour, self-paced online class, then participate in a 4- to 5-hour Instructor-led live, in-person training.  The course is offered monthly throughout the school year and is available to staff and parents The next session will be October 28th, 2021.   Parents who wish to participate may register by calling Student Services at 703-228-6062 or emailing Marjorie.Blazek@apsva.us or jennifer.lambdin@apsva.us.

Mental Health CornerPIcture of animated brains

Screen Shot 2021-10-14 at 2.57.37 PMSources of Strength Peer Leaders at HB Woodlawn hosted a school-wide event to recognize National Suicide Prevention Month. Students worked with Siobhan Bowler, their APS Substance Abuse Counselor, to educate the community about risk and protective factors related to suicide prevention.

Screen Shot 2021-10-14 at 2.56.41 PMThe W-L School Counseling department designed a “calm room” located inside the counseling suite to help students eliminate stress during the school day. The goal is to continue to build a “positive school community” and “provide skills for resilience.”

 

Arlington Department of Human Services (DHS) Community Resources

APS collaborates with our agency colleagues in the Department of Human Services (DHS) to provide services and build capacity across our community.  An example of this collaboration is a newsletter, “Building Healthy Communities” where many opportunities for parents and community members are highlighted each month.

Student Services Newsletter September 2021

This year APS will have a SEL focus each month. A different SEL competency and overarching concept will be addressed in classrooms with lessons and activities, and we encourage you to work with your students at home and in the community to further develop these social and emotional skills. Suggesting questions and activities will be provided each month in this newsletter.

Social-Emotional Learning (SEL)

Image of CASEL competencies from VDOE https://www.doe.virginia.gov/support/prevention/social-emotional/index.shtml#staThis past July, the Virginia Department of Education established a uniform definition of social emotional learning based on the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional (CASEL) definition:

“Social and emotional learning is the process through which all young people and adults acquire and apply the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to develop healthy identities, manage emotions and achieve personal and collective goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain supportive relationships, and make responsible and caring decisions.”

Virginia’s vision for SEL is intended to center equity in this work which is key to VDOE’s vision and mission, and aligns without priorities in APS as well. The Virginia definition was intentionally created to include adults as well as students. Social emotional learning is important for all of us to become better human beings. You can find more information about the VDOE SEL standards here –  VDOE Social Emotional Learning (SEL)

Over the summer, a team of school counselors, social workers, and psychologists, worked on several projects to align our SEL curriculums and tiers of support with the new standards. They also created staff SEL Canvas pages to support the implementation of SEL and the development of all APS staff.

This year APS will have a SEL focus each month. A different SEL competency and overarching concept will be addressed in classrooms with lessons and activities, and we encourage you to work with your students at home and in the community to further develop these social and emotional skills. Suggesting questions and activities will be provided each month in this newsletter.

September SEL Focus: Relationship Skills

picture of Stephanie Martin
School Counselor Stephanie Martin at Long Branch Elementary School

Apply verbal and non-verbal communication and listening skills to interact with others, form and maintain positive relationships, and resolve conflict constructively.

Questions for Discussion (NOTE: Answers should be accepted with no judgement.)

  • What are some things you can do with your body when someone is talking to show you are listening?
  • What are some things you can say after someone has spoken to show that you heard them and are not judging them?
  • What can you say and do when having a disagreement with a someone to show respect for yourself and them?
  • Who would you talk to at home if…(you needed help, you made a bad choice, you have good news to share, etc.)? Who would you talk to at school…?
  • Who is someone at home (and school) you want to be closer to? What can you do to make that happen?
  • Who is an adult that you talked to at school today? Who will you talk to tomorrow?

Activities:

  • Spend time together. Play games. Eat meals. Go on walks. Work on a puzzle. Read a book. Be intentional about the time you spend together, making sure that times allows for communication.
  • Have one-on-one chats to build and strengthen individual relationships.
  • Make decisions together about what to do for specials events such as birthdays and holidays.
  • One minute shares. Allow everyone a minute to share on a topic of their choice. While someone is sharing everyone else is practicing active listening. (Eyes watching speaker, ears listening, voice quiet, body calm.) When speaker is finished, the listeners and share what they heard with no judgement. Example – So you are saying that you really did not have fun when we worked on the puzzle. Is that correct?

Healthy relationship skills are the ability to get along with others and make meaningful connections. Relationships take time to build and they can be difficult to develop and maintain. Learning and practicing the skills needed to build healthy relationships are life-skills that will help now and in years to come.

First 20 days of SEL

In line with the theme of relationship skills, each day during the first month of school, all staff will be focusing on connecting with their students and helping to foster connections among peers and the school community. Student Services has provided lessons and activities to be used in class for the “First 20 Days of School.” Lessons are taught at designated times in the class environment through social-emotional learning activities that build relationship skills in the class environment and/or support students in self-reflective practices.

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month—a time to share resources in an effort to shed light on this serious and often stigmatized topic. We use this month to raise awareness and connect individuals with resources and support. Suicidal thoughts, much like mental health conditions, can affect anyone regardless of age, gender or background. In fact, suicide is often the result of an untreated mental health condition. At this time, suicide is the second leading cause of death in people age 10-24. Suicidal thoughts, although common, should not be considered normal and often indicate more serious issues.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, please get help now. Access mental health resources by clicking the “Need to Talk?” Button on the APS District Webpage. In addition, all APS schools have a comprehensive mental health team, including counselors, school psychologists and social workers to support students and families in need.

https://www.apsva.us/mental-health-services/in-crisis-need-help-now/

Youth Mental Health First Aid Training

The Office of Student Services continues to be committed to training all new staff  and re-certifying staff in Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA). This is a 6-hour course that teaches how to identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. Registration for staff is through Frontline. Parents can register by calling the Office of Student Services at 703-228-6062.Training will be provided every month for the remainder of the year starting on September 23, September 30, October 14, October 28, November 16, December 1, January 13, February 8, March 10, March 31, April 27, and May 10.

Resources

Children’s Regional Crisis Response (CR2)

  • CR2 Provides 24- Hour rapid response to all youth (17 & younger) facing a mental health and/or substance use crisis. Their highly trained and compassionate counselors provide phone screening and face-to-face assessment, intervention, and support so that your child and family may continue with life as planned.
    • Call for 24-Hour Crisis Services 844-627-4747Information: 703-257-5997
    • Website: CR2crisis.com

In need of Emergency Mental Health Services? Call:

  • Arlington Behavioral Healthcare ServicesEmergency Line: 703-228-5160 General Number: 703-228-1560

Worried your child may attempt suicide/self-harm? Not sure what to do? Call:

  • Crisis Link Regional Hot Line: 703-527-4077 or Text: CONNECT to 85511
  • National Hope Line: 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)
  • LGBTQ Lifeline: 1-866-488-7386
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)
  • SAMHSA National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (1-800-662-4357)

Local Resources:

Web Resources:

Video – Teen Suicide Prevention for Parents-Mayo Clinic